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Ongoing short intermittent dropouts (logs attached)

MichaelMMichaelM Posts: 9 ✭✭
edited August 31 in Connectivity Aug 26, 2020

Hi,

I have legacy TWC Extreme Internet and am experiencing speeds with ~60 Mbps but with intermittent dropouts throughout the day. Generally 3-4 people in household using devices. I've had Spectrum tech visit the property a number of times over the years. Tends to improve after they visit and then degrade slowly. Line enters property from telephone pole. Using Netgear CM1000 modem. Logs below. Any help would be appreciated. Last time they visited they inserted a signal attenuator on modem. Modem plugs into a hardwired TP-link router which feeds an Orbi Mesh Access Point which distributes WiFi. Please help me fix these dropouts.



Replies

  • misterjmisterj Posts: 80 ✭✭✭✭
    Aug 26, 2020

    MichaelM, what speed do you have? I assume this modem is yours. I have been looking forwark to seeing inside a DOCSIS 3.1 modem. I will need to do some research - printed your screenshot. Looks like you have 32 QAM channels and 1 OFDM channel locked and I do not understand why. Your signal levels and SNR look fine. Perhaps you have a lot ingress. The Spectrum techs should have measured that and corrected it. Please post a picture of the cable from your wall to the modem and inside the box on the outside of your home. Thanks and enjoy, John.

  • MichaelMMichaelM Posts: 9 ✭✭
    edited August 26 Aug 26, 2020

    MisterJ, thanks for the quick resposne. Even on my bill, Spectrum does not state the speed, but I am recording speeds of 60-70 Mbps throughout the day. Here are the photos, and I'd appreciate feedback on the channel lock issues you noted above. Here are the pics requested. they show the Spectrum cable from pole to home, the cable box on exterior of home and my utility box showing my Netgear CM1000 modem and TP-Link router. Note the signal attenuator on the modem. Thank you!


  • RAIST5150RAIST5150 Posts: 794 ✭✭✭✭
    edited August 26 Aug 26, 2020

    @MichaelM

    Something is off on your return path... one upstream channel has gone out, and the remaining three are screaming at 49.5 trying to get through to the head end. If it gets much higher it will trigger a reboot of the modem.

    This may simply be a side effect of how they attempted to attenuate the line--may have injected too much noise/loss in the return, or perhaps there is a maladjusted gain in play. Depending on what is going on, this MIGHT require escalation to another team, but that call will likely need another tech visit to identify and file for said escalation if needed.

    Would be interesting to know what the levels were prior to them trying to adjust them. Netgears are typically good at handling higher signal levels than many modems, so depending on how much they tried to draw it down may have been unnecessary considering your hardware (unless it was overloading a cable box, in which case it may have been better to tweak the line AFTER the modem line breaks out to avoid interfering with the modem).

    Likely your on again/off again, good/bad cycle is tied into this upstream issue. When the modem reboots, it will drop upstream power and will start increasing it again as the head end tells it to in order to get better signal. Things start off "good", and gradually degrade with the modem adjusting trying to correct issues, until it can't and has to reset.. Rinse/repeat.

    In the short term, as best as you reasonably can, inspect your cable runs out to where your cable comes into the home. The techs will be limited on the changes they can effect inside the home, so if some issues are found inside it may fall to you guys or the landlord to address.

    Cable shielding needs to be intact with no signs of stress from things like stretching, excessive twisting/turning/kinking (should not bend sharper the about the curve you would get around a 2 liter soda bottle). Connectors need to be slightly more than finger tight with no signs of corrosion--tight and bright, as they say. Any evidence of moisture needs to be removed and the cause addressed--standing water and such can cause problems with the radio waves running through the cable.

    The cable runs should be reduced to as few devices as necessary... no more splits than necessary and every split needs to be terminated by either an actual device or a termination cap. Any unneeded barrel junctions should be removed as well.

    Every time you insert a device along a coax line, you risk injecting noise and/or signal loss to varying degrees depending on the device inserted and the length of cable on each side of it. As best as possible you want a continuous run from their entry point to the modem as you can reasonably achieve, without a lot of excess cable.

  • misterjmisterj Posts: 80 ✭✭✭✭
    edited August 26 Aug 26, 2020

    Thanks, MichaelM. I see no problem with 49dBmV upstream channel or the unlocked upstream channel. Three channels may be plenty for your upload specification. What does your upload test? www.nerp.com is a good test site. The thing that I do not understand is that you have 32 locked QAM channels and a locked OFDM. This tells me you have 384 MHz of spectrum in use. You will have to discuss this with Spectrum. Either I do not understand what you screenshot is saying (good possibility) or something is wrong. Please ask them what your paid Down/Up speeds should be. I do not know what Extreme Internet is but maybe 400 Mbps or Gbps.

    Thanks for the pictures. They all look very good. Enjoy, John.

    EDIT: Interesting reading: https://forums.xfinity.com/t5/Your-Home-Network/DOCSIS-3-1-Modem-not-provisioned-correctly-DOCSIS-3-0-QAM/td-p/3312725#

  • misterjmisterj Posts: 80 ✭✭✭✭
    edited August 26 Aug 26, 2020

    MichaelM, please look at the entire article I posted above. I think the OP has a similar problem as you and it was ultimately corrected by replacing the coax for the pole to the house. Spectrum should at least temporarily lay a coax across your yard. The link above shows that other modems (different maker) also produce 49dBmV signals on upstream. Enjoy, John.


    EDIT: What color are the lights on the front of your Modem?

  • RAIST5150RAIST5150 Posts: 794 ✭✭✭✭
    edited August 26 Aug 26, 2020

    51 on upstream is a general "no go" threshold here... crossing this line is where you start risking automatic reboots. These channels init low and only increase when instructed to from the head end as needed in an attempt to correct for instability. With 3 or more ATDMA channels at 5120, 51 is the common threshold where it will call for a reboot (lower spec channel allotment allows for higher levels).

    Dramatic environmental shifts can cause up to a 2 point shift (or more depending on varying factors).

    This system/modem are spec'ed to latch 4 channels, it is holding 3 of the 3.0 channels, and 2 of those had already ramped up to 49.5 and 49.8.


    All of that adds up to indicating a problem on the upstream side--especially when coupled with seeing north of 9 on the downstream side. With signals that strong on the downside, it is not far off to expect upstream to hold around 47 or less for most of the day, even in the summer.

  • RAIST5150RAIST5150 Posts: 794 ✭✭✭✭
    edited August 26 Aug 26, 2020

    @MichaelM

    May want to check the modem's temps... may not be getting good ventilation like that. It needs good convection to cool properly.

    Might be interesting to see what it does without the choke on there... picture is fuzzy, but that blue band reminds me of the Holland pads... 3db. Netgears typically handle over +10 well enough (technical limit is 15, have seen them manage up to 12 just fine on their lines).

    Just can't help but wonder if they took the worse approach to align your levels... if it wouldn't have been better to adjust the gains upstream to bring JUST the downstream levels down and leaving upstream where it was. (I get WHY the tech did it, even if there was a "clamshell" on the ground, they are not authorized to open it--has to be escalated to another team).

  • MichaelMMichaelM Posts: 9 ✭✭
    Aug 27, 2020

    I want to thank everyone for responding and being so helpful.

    I'm going to do two things on my end to eliminate that it's on my side. I plan to move the modem from the garage (where the temps are high currently in SoCal and, to accomplish this, I'm going to reroute the coax and CAT5 into the home. The CAT5 is 8 years old, so I will probably replace it. Hopefully this will take care of it. If it doesn't, then I'll have Spectrum out to inspect their end. Thanks

  • misterjmisterj Posts: 80 ✭✭✭✭
    Aug 27, 2020

    MichaelM., there is something seriously wrong with your provisioning. Please do not move anything until this is corrected. The operating environment for your modem is :

    • Operating temperature: 32° to 104°F (0° to 40°C)

    • Operating humidity: 90% maximum relative humidity

    I doubt you are too hot unless you close the box the CM1000 is in.

    Please look in your modem and report the Firmware version. It should be V3.01.06. Spectrum should push the latest version if not. More to come. Please do not tear down your setup. Be back soon. Enjoy, John.

  • Julia_RJulia_R Posts: 4,287 Lead Mod
    Aug 27, 2020


    @misterj Good morning. The firmware on the device will automatically be updated to the latest approved firmware that has been tested and cleared on our network. It may not be the most recent release from the manufacturer. They are however backwards compatible. Once the newest firmware has been cleared the modems will be automatically updated.


    @MichaelM I have sent you a private message to follow up on this.


    Thanks!

    Julia_R

  • misterjmisterj Posts: 80 ✭✭✭✭
    Aug 27, 2020

    MichaelM., looking at your screenshots, I see two full host connections. One is DOCSIS 3.0 and one is 3.1. Each have 192 MHz in use for downstream (DS) and each also has an upstream (US) connection. Both DS connections seem to have activity - with errors and error free codewords. Just the DS is using 384 MHz and I am sure that is not Spectrum's intent. If you will look at the link I posted above, you will see no such dual connection, only a DOCSIS 3.0 connection using 192 MHz. I suggest you talk to Spectrum, find what US and DS speeds you are paying for and explain what I have told you. Thanks and enjoy, John.

  • RAIST5150RAIST5150 Posts: 794 ✭✭✭✭
    edited August 27 Aug 27, 2020

    @MichaelM

    Actually, moving things inside is very smart... may resolve different issues, and open up more possibilities for improvement. It has potential to better balance signal levels without the need for a pad (potentially a longer cable run), may provide potential for better wifi and/or general network setup/maintenance... and let us not overlook the general benefits of bringing hardware into a climate controlled environment (among other reasons, excess heat and/or humidity over time are silent killers of hardware).

    Once you get things wired up, take a good look at those signal levels. If you do indeed windup with a longer cable run, those 3.0 upstream channels may eventually hit the 50db mark on a hot day, and the downstream levels may also drop a point or two as well. Which means it may be prudent to have them take that FAM-3 attenuater off the line. If they still deem the downstream is higher than they are comfortable with after removing that 3db, it may need escalation to address things further upstream.

  • MichaelMMichaelM Posts: 9 ✭✭
    Aug 27, 2020

    You are all so kind to help. Here's the update. The Netgear CM1000 firmware is V3.01.06 (Spectrum's current approved version). Yesterday, I converted my status as TWC Legacy Extreme Internet plan to Spectrum 200 Mbps. Whereas I was experiencing 65 Mbps down on the old plan, the new speeds are faster but variable. While I just clocked 200 Mbps down, it has been as low as 85, with most speedtests resulting around 100 Mbps. However, that has not fixed the dropouts. We experienced a 10-15 minute dropout this morning. To review, I currently have Netgear CM1000 modem and TP-Link Safestream TL-R600VPN router in the garage in an open utility cabinet. This router is hardwired to an Orbi Mesh (inside home) that I use as an access point to distribute WiFi throughout the house (both base unit plus satellite). The TP-Link is also hardwired to the TV (netflix). Below, I have re-posted today's logs (8/27) and have added a router log for the TP-Link. I'm sorry the modem log is not easier to read. I am probably a good week out from being able to move the modem/router inside the house, so I will continue to try to troubleshoot the dropouts until such time. I have a fan blowing on the equipment in the garage now, as the temps in SoCal have pushed 100 and likely hotter in garage.. I will have time to read MisterJ's info link tonight (thanks!).


  • misterjmisterj Posts: 80 ✭✭✭✭
    Aug 27, 2020

    Thanks, Julia_R. I just learned that the ISP pushed updates even to user owned modems. I am no sure I care for this as I am considering buying a modem so I will no longer be locked out. I do not understand preventing user login and it seems only to create more work for Spectrum. Enjoy, John.

  • RAIST5150RAIST5150 Posts: 794 ✭✭✭✭
    edited August 27 Aug 27, 2020

    @MichaelM

    Yeah... that 50.5 on the upstream 3.0 channels needs some attention. Those are typically 5120 rate ATDMA, which will typically make a modem bug out at around 51+.

    Getting a handle on temps may help some of that, but that is kinda "danger close" to a stall/reboot situation for most modems running 3.0 at that level.

    Moving inside is a good idea. We get the same type of temperature swings here in SC as well, so have to make sure we have headroom for things to spread out in the summer months.

  • misterjmisterj Posts: 80 ✭✭✭✭
    Aug 27, 2020

    Thanks, MichaelM. I do not really know what to say! An Internet search found this:

    Upstream (Tx) Transmit Power (a.k.a. Return Signal) level:

    This is the amount of signal transmitted by the modem to reach the receiver in the cable company head-end.

    *Recommended Upstream signal levels are +35 dBmV to +47 dBmV (DOCSIS 3.1)

    *Recommended Upstream signal levels are +35 dBmV to +49 dBmV (DOCSIS 3.0)

    50 dBmV maximum for OFDMA (DOCSIS 3.1)

    52 dBmV maximum for A-TDMA, TDMA & SC-QAM (DOCSIS 3.0)

    53 dBmV maximum for S-CDMA DOCSIS 2.0 (All Modulations)

    54 dBmV maximum for 32 QAM and 64 QAM. (A-TDMA DOCSIS 2.0)

    55 dBmV maximum for 8 QAM and 16 QAM. (DOCSIS 1.0, 1.1)

    58 dBmV maximum for QPSK. (DOCSIS 1.0, 1.1)

    So, I do not have a clue why one would give attention to 50.5 dBmV. I have no intention of getting into any push/shove, but will keep an eye on your thread, MichaelM. Please address me specifically if you think I can help you - always glad to help. Thanks and enjoy, John.

  • RAIST5150RAIST5150 Posts: 794 ✭✭✭✭
    edited August 27 Aug 27, 2020

    Have to frame things in their proper context... how things typically behave on this system, and apply it to the situation.

    Regardless of all the context though, 50.5 upstream for 3+ ATDMA upstream at 5120 rate is a concern because of the troubleshooting guidelines for the system in question. 51 is the Arris/Motorola cap for that spec. That is kinda a troubleshooting baseline that has been in play on this system for quite a long time. Crossing 49 sets off a flag, approaching 51 sets off another.

    We have already seen upstream increase a full point, while downstream dropped roughly 2 on THIS line.

    We know how temperature impacts these values.

    The modem has half it's vents at least somewhat restricted, in a box, in a garage... and outdoor temps are hitting 100.

    We also just found out this is a region with potential to have even hotter days in the summer.

    Apply all this to the OP's original concerns about the pattern of instability...

    Yes... seeing those upstream channels at around 49.5 and then move up to 50.5 is cause for concern in THIS context.

  • MichaelMMichaelM Posts: 9 ✭✭
    edited August 30 Aug 30, 2020

    I did some testing. I took a laptop to the garage and plugged it directly into the router which hangs off the modem. Same power levels and uncorrectibles as above. I replaced the ethernet cable from modem to router, and router to laptop. Same test results.

    Next, I removed the signal attenuator from the modem and got the readings below. The power levels are lower. I still get uncorrectibles.

    1. Are the new dBmV ratings within spec?
    2. Should channel 32 on the downstream be locked?
    3. Should channel 1 on the upstream be locked?
    4. Removing the attenuator did lower dBmV but did other measurements get worse?
    5. The only thing I could do is replace the CM1000 with the old surfboard modem to see if things change. Would I need to call Spectrum to activate the old modem if I changed it out?

    Results with signal attenuator removed from modem:


  • misterjmisterj Posts: 80 ✭✭✭✭
    Aug 30, 2020

    Thanks, MichaelM. I think your levels are fine. Down Stream (DS) should be -15 to +15 dBmV. Some will like them lower. I assume you did a reset before posting. Please post a speed test. I recommend www. nperf.com. I would think DS channel 32 should be locked. Three Up Stream (US) channels are fairly normal and it seems to vary which three. You will need to call Spectrum to give them the MAC address of your old modem. Is it a DOCSIS 3.0? It may well support 200 Mbps but not a lot more. 32 channels are not needed for 200 and 16 should be enough. What is your old modem? This will be a good experiment. Thanks and enjoy, John.

  • MichaelMMichaelM Posts: 9 ✭✭
    Aug 30, 2020

    I tried plugging in the old surfboard modem but couldn't make a connection. My thought is that Spectrum must be called in order to activate it. So I removed it and reconnected the CM1000 and then tested the speed:

    nperf: 238 Mbps down; 12.4 up; 28 ms latency.

    fast.com: 200 Mbps down; 10 up; 14 ms (unloaded) 32 ms (loaded) latency

    More importantly, the uncorrectibles went away. The only difference between this setup and yesterday is that I removed the signal attenuator that Spectrum had installed on the modem. Channel 32 is still not locking.

    :

  • misterjmisterj Posts: 80 ✭✭✭✭
    Aug 30, 2020

    Thanks, MichaelM. You will always need to call Spectrum when changing modems to give them the MAC address. The funny thing is it looks like you have an OFDM connection over 90% correctable errors. I would suggest watching it and if it continues to run as measured, you are good. If not then you must contact Spectrum. Please keep us informed. Please contact NetGear and ask them about channel 32. Thanks and enjoy, John.

  • RAIST5150RAIST5150 Posts: 794 ✭✭✭✭
    edited August 30 Aug 30, 2020

    A lot to look at there... sorry for the wall of text....for the TLDR, for the most part things look normal/acceptable for how a Netgear typically performs, with a few exceptions that may be by design because of the transition, or some oversight during the transition.. If it is performing well, no worries--but if it still has bouts of instability, may want to try your old modem if it is of decent spec (ie, 16 channels, definitely no less than 8), or could try a Spectrum modem for free as a test also. If a tech comes and wants to pad the line, see if you can get them to use one that will not impact upstream signal.

    @MichaelM

    You will always see errors. Some may occur when you aren't actively sending/receiving data yourself... can occur during maintenance intervals and such that cause the modem to range for new channels and stuff. having a really bad ratio is what sets off the flags... so have to frame the numbers in that context. Even though you are seeing over 1000 uncorrected errors in the 3.0 channels, that is against over 2billion packets total. While we would LOVE to see no errors, it just is not practical with how the system works.

    As for the channel locks, they simply may not be available for the 3.0 use, since they are bringing the OFDM into play. Hard to say without knowing how frequencies are assigned over there. We had a massive reassignment of frequencies a while back, and ran into all kinds of issues initially. Used to be lined up similar to yours, but now when we pull spectrum we see it broken into different blocks. We don't use anything in the 500-600 space anymore. The 3.0 channels roll off at 303 on the bottom and 495 at the top, with seperate blocks of spectrum centered roughly around 100, 215, and then 675MHz.

    It is possible that an old school TV choke could be out there blocking some frequency at the tail end though.. Saw this happen in our market, knocking out a channel at the bottom end of the list. Showed up as a weird trailing slope at the end when we discovered it on the old assignments::

    Don't know with any degree of certainty, but note that our roll off was running right around where you could have one more channel show up at your lower end, which would fall roughly around where channels 70-76 would fall on the older cable TV systems. It might supposed to be there for a lock, but it may just be getting blocked.

    Anywho... looks like you are currently getting set up to use the 3.0 channels primarily for downstream, as it has grabbed 567. Hopefully this is helping to offset delays you may incur if it was trying to use the OFDM channel with the way it is having to correct over 60% of it's packets. There seems to be a lot of noise going on there that needs to get cleaned up for OFDM downstream to be more reliable. If it is however aggregating that channel, it might explain some of the issues you saw with the wide variance in throughput earlier.

    So, on that front, if your older modem is a DOCSIS 3.,0 modem (no OFDM channel support), it may hold up better if you were to put it on the line. Just keep in mind that in order to more reliably maintain 200mbps down, it will likely need to be at least a 16 channel modem with the way the system works. An 8 channel may be hit and miss during higher usage times.

    As to the downstream channels, again... the 17/18-ish MHz channel you would nomrally see in the first slot may have been reassigned since they now have an OFDM upstream channel to use. So It may not even need the 3 upstream 3.0 channels at all, considering the OFDM appears "clean". Whether the CMTS told id to use them or not though, it will still monitor them and the modem can trigger a reboot if the power level gets too high. Hopefully it behaves better on that front with them holding well under the 51 mark. That is something that only time will tell.

    For completeness of troubleshooting sake though, if your bandwidth numbers or the modem uptime is still erratic, you may want to give your old modem a shot if it is of a decent spec, or alternatively you could opt for a Spectrum provided one as a test case as well. The old system used to track the last two modems you used on a line, so you could swap them yourself through device management when you logged into your account... but think they did away with that. Don't think the online activation tool is still out there either (would pop up with a link when you tried to use the web with the new modem). So you may need to call it in and give them at least the MAC address on the label on the bottom/back of the unit. Will likely have to do the power cycling in order of entry for the signal for good measure to make sure things synch up properly and all (modem > router > AP's...).

    If through this whole ordeal a tech comes and wants to pad the line again though, see if you can get them to use one that will not impact upstream signal so you can keep that close to where it is now.., it is much more in line with where Spectrum likes to see their levels. Ideally, it would likely be better for maintenance to adjust gains upstream from your location though... because these values may shift more than the AGC tweaks them when the cooler weather comes in.

  • MichaelMMichaelM Posts: 9 ✭✭
    Sep 01, 2020

    I had a chance to swap out my Netgear CM1000 for an older CM600. I had to have Spectrum Support on the line in order to activate the old modem on their network. The stats are below. The tech support person stated that it looked more stable than the CM1000 on his end. Speeds are 238 Mbps down; 11.7 Mbps Up with 28ms latency on nperf.com What do you think of the stats below? Should I keep CM600 in service?

    and the router:


  • misterjmisterj Posts: 80 ✭✭✭✭
    Sep 01, 2020

    MichaelM, I was very excited about OFDM and DOCSIS 3.1, but from my experience here it is clear that some ISPs do not know how to implement it, resulting in really bad performance. I am a true believer in the KISS principle and strongly recommend you stay with CM600 and if it were me I would get a refund if possible on the CM1000. It would be nice to know what the tech meant by "...looked more stable...". OFDM keeps looking for the best performance including switching to QAM (DOCSIS 3.0). I suspect something goes wrong in the switch and maybe both are active at once and ultimately use up all available bandwidth. Until whatever is corrected, OFDM will be unusable. As long as you plan on staying with 200/10, 24 channels are more than enough. I ran for several years a good and solid 200/10 on 16 channels. Three up is fine also. Thanks and enjoy, John.

  • RAIST5150RAIST5150 Posts: 794 ✭✭✭✭
    edited September 1 Sep 01, 2020

    @MichaelM

    The 600 is a good modem... have one of those also. Just make sure the wall wart power supply has good ventilation, as they tend to flake out more frequently.

    Unfortunately, there are still signaling issues that they need to address. The modem swap isn't exactly the "solution"... more like a workaround while they are transitioning to better support gig servicing. Kinda sucks that the changes are getting in the way of locking the upstream channel usually at the 17-19MHz block. Not tripping any registration errors for it though, so the CMTS appears to be adjusting the time slices to compensate for not binding the usual 4 channels.

    But if it starts acting weird on upstream again and/or you start to see a lot of errors, may want to contact Spectrum about it. Make sure to capture the logs and such in case you need to submit them for review, as such things can come and go. Frustrating when it clears up when you finally have someone taking a look at the line.

    As to whether to keep the 1000 or not... it may work just fine once they get the 267mhz channel cleaned up (or assign a different root frequency for that OFDM channel). So it may still be a good modem to have on hand down the line.

    Personally, I like having an alternate modem on hand that can meet the demands of my current tier that I can swap in for troubleshooting. That is why my 500 is online atm... ran into issues while the 600 was provisioned. Tech tried to blame it on my CPE, so swapped to the 500 and when it still misbehaved, was eventually able to convince them to look elsewhere and found it was actually a signal quality issue up the line and nothing to do with my CPE.

    If you were wanting to roll specifically with the 1000, and it isn't a hardship on the wallet, may be worth hanging on to. You could try putting it back on the line again once the signaling issues clear up. Would be nice if you had the 500 model instead, as it has a handy tool that could give more perspective on signaling (disabled in the 600). But you may still spot changes on the signal page that indicate improvements have been made or are coming. Like, if you see the 600 start binding a 4th upstream again, they may have cleaned things up a bit more, or if you see a dramatic shift in frequency assignments for the downstream channels (like channels in the 300's, or no more over 550 would indicate a big channel reassignment took place.)

    Long term though, I would still consider moving that hardware indoors. That isn't really coming from a signal quality perspective (though it may change things a bit)... but more from a maintenance angle. It can go a long ways towards prolonging the life of the equipment, and has the potential to make it easier to manage/troubleshoot your setup.

  • MichaelMMichaelM Posts: 9 ✭✭
    Sep 02, 2020

    I want to thank MisterJ and Raist5150 for all of your support over the past week. I have not had drop outs since removing the signal attenuator from the modem. Hopefully this ends up being a permanent fix. Over the next few weeks, I'll reroute the cables into the home and move the equipment inside. Consider this thread closed. Thank you again.

  • misterjmisterj Posts: 80 ✭✭✭✭
    Sep 02, 2020

    You are very welcome, MichaelM. Enjoy, John.

  • MichaelMMichaelM Posts: 9 ✭✭
    Sep 07, 2020

    Folks, one more question. We hit 115 degrees here yesterday. Another important reason to move the modem from the uninsulated garage to inside the home. Will Spectrum field tech relocate the coax run? As a reminder, it comes to the house from telephone pole to cable box (pic in this thread) and then along the inside of roof's fascia board where it enters the attic through a vent. From there, it goes to garage. I'd like to reroute and fish it down a wall which, luckily, is only about 8 feet from vent (where it enters the attic) which is MUCH closer than the garage (so current length of coax is more than sufficient). The wall I'd fish it down already has ethernet cable running through it from attic so no drilling and no need to install wall plate because I already have a duplex plate, and one opening I can swap out the existing ethernet jack for a brush plate that will accommodate the 2 existing ethernet cables and the re-routed coax cable.

    Will Spectrum field tech re-route the coax cable free or for a fee? I called but they are closed for Labor Day. The reason I'm posting here, is if they do not, does anyone know the type of company I would call in Los Angeles to help me do this? I don't think Geek Squad does. I tried Craigslist but nothing popped off the page. Thanks

  • RAIST5150RAIST5150 Posts: 794 ✭✭✭✭
    Sep 07, 2020

    When we were TWC here, they had independent contractors that would do that kind of work. IDK how Spectrum handles that now... they are pretty stand-off-ish on manipulating in-house stuff.

    At my last house. I paid $99 for the guy to run a line from the pedestal to the back office... but it literally was just drilling straight through the outer wall to do it. If it has to be fished, probably would have been more.

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